How Long Should You Keep Doing Something Fearful?


There are times in life when we really are afraid of doing something, and yet we bow to the logic of those around us and those who trained us in our thinking habits, and we go ahead with it anyway. Then we feel proud of ourselves for defeating the fear. But if it’s really been defeated, why is it there, in that swirling anxious feeling inside? Why does it return in the face of a similar project or condition? And then you’re supposed to defeat that too, and be proud again?

 

Let’s stop and look at how irrational much of our actions are in the face of working with the law of attraction to deliberately create an expansive, joyous, happy life. When you feel bad inside and take action anyway, you’re pretty much guaranteeing that something will go wrong. It might not be with that particular project—because we can often force results with sheer will power—but there will be repercussions in your life to match the energy of all that fear. Perhaps you’ll have a car accident on the way home from the meeting that engendered all that nervousness. Or catch the flu that’s going around and be violently ill for several weeks.

 

There’s a difference between wanting something very much with the understanding you’ll need to step out of what feels comfortable in order to attract it to you, and being terrified or uneasy because you really don’t want this at all.  It’s a false goal. One that others imposed on you and you accepted the burden.

 

Take a look at your life and see where you are using force to get things, force to make yourself go to a job that does not utilize your gifts, force to keep going through the motions in a dull relationship.

 

And then, make a new choice. Love and fear are opposites. Go for the love. It’s a great choice, every time.

 

In keeping with this lesson, Abraham-Hicks reminds us, “There are those that say, if you do the uncomfortable thing long enough, it will become comfortable. But we are really not encouragers of that. We are encouragers of coming into alignment, and then taking the action. We are encouragers always of getting rid of the fear; we would never want you to keep doing things that you feel fearful about. And maybe the path of least resistance is just not get on the horse. Maybe the path of least resistance is to get on a different horse—but we would never move forward in fear.”